Bank Hackers Steal Millions via Malware

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My buddy Aamir Lakahni at drchaos wrote a interesting post about criminals using RAT tools to steal boat loads of money from banks. The original post can be found HERE.

Another week, another hack. A group of cybercriminals used phishing attacks to install remote access toolkits (RATs) and steal over $300 million from banks and other financial institutions (source: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/15/world/bank-hackers-steal-millions-via-malware.html)

Using RATs is not new, and common method cybercriminals use. We had an in-depth look at njRAT and the Sweet Orange Exploit on this site. It is also not uncommon to use phishing and other social engineering attacks by attackers to trick users into installing sophisticated malicious tools. Continue reading

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Dont Just Click Any Link – Avoiding Phishing, Social Engineering And Other Attacks

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I’ve said this many times before … the Internet is full of bad things. Of those bad things, one of the most common threats is Phishing attacks. Wiki defines phishing as “the act of attempting to acquire information such as usernames, passwords, and credit card details (and sometimes, indirectly, money) by masquerading as a trustworthy entity in an electronic communication”. The majority of successful phishing attacks clone popular social networking sources and provide hyperlinks with the hope a target will click the link without questioning the authenticity of the source.

I wrote a post about what to look for regarding fraud email and craiglist sales HERE and 2 example craiglist cons HERE. The concepts are generally the same regarding identifying phishing attackers however in some cases, the attack will be a clone of a real message or website, which makes it very difficult to detect. Best practices is THINK BEFORE YOU CLICK! Here are some examples why this is important. Continue reading

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RSA Europe talk on Emily Williams found on PCWorld, Yahoo news, Cio.com and other sources

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My buddy Aamir Lakhani and I performed a penetration test using social media sources (Facebook and LinkedIn) as a method to compromise users from our target. You can find more about our project aka Emily Williams HERE and HERE as well as at www.drchaos.com. Continue reading

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Speaker at (ISC)2 Security Congress 2013 Chicago Sept 24th-27th on Social Engineering / Remote Hacking

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I’ll be speaking at this years (ISC)2 ASIS International Conference in Chicago. More info on the event can be found HERE. The conference program can be found HERE.

Continue reading

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PART 2 “The Attack” – THE SOCIAL MEDIA DECEPTION PROJECT : How We Created Emily Williams To Compromise Our Target

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Last year Aamir Lakhani and Joseph Muniz developed a fake identity known as Emily Williams with the purpose of compromising a specific target using social media. We created Emily Williams based on research from Robin Sage, which showcased how a fake identity could obtain sensitive information from social media resources. We wondered if a similar approach could be used for targeted attacks and developed Emily Williams for that purpose. More information on developing Emily Williams via Part 1 of this project can be found HERE. Continue reading

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THE SOCIAL MEDIA DECEPTION PROJECT : How We Created Emily Williams To Compromise Our Target

Disclaimer: This post has been modified to exclude specific subjects not approved for public viewing


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Emily Williams and Robin Sage

Emily Williams and Robin Sage don’t exist in the real world. They are fake social network accounts designed to obtain sensitive information. Robin Sage was created in late 2009 to obtain information from intelligence on US military personnel. Her story was presented at the Black Hat hacker conference upsetting many people by exposing the type of sensitive data provided over social networks. Joey Muniz and Aamir Lakhani decided to go one-step further and ask the hard question: “what else can happen outside of data being leaked over social networks”. We decided to find out using Emily Williams. Continue reading

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