The Imminent Demise of Bitcoin

Aamir Lakhani wrote a fantastic overview on Bitcoins. You can find the original HERE via www.drchaos.com.

Bitcoin started as a transparent open source currency that provided anonymity. It also provided advantages over traditional currency. Bitcoin is not bound to any organization or country. It is a peer-to-peer trading currency, so it is not subject to financial institutions such as banks, merchants, or payment gateways. A Bitcoin, in almost every way, is like real currency coins that you can use, spend, and save. However, like real currency, it can also be destroyed, lost, and stolen.

Bitcoin 1024x1024 The Imminent Demise of Bitcoin Continue reading

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

End of availability for the Cisco IPSEC VPN Client this summer. Time to migrate!

computer management End of availability for the Cisco IPSEC VPN Client this summer. Time to migrate!

For those that have been hanging on to the old Cisco IPSEC client, its time to really consider a migration. The client will no longer be downloadable as of July 29th of this 2014 year. This also means it will no longer be supported. The official notice can be found HERE. Continue reading

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Open App ID: Cisco commits to open source and application identification

bart os Open App ID: Cisco commits to open source and application identification

My buddy Aamir wrote a summary of the open source announcement by Cisco at RSA last week (original post can be found HERE). Cisco also announced integrating FireAMP with Cisco email, web and cloud security products. FireAMP gives Cisco products the ability to detect infected files by searching for known hashes, sandboxing unknown files and other detection means. More on the FireAMP capabilities can be found HERE. Another source for these announcements is on the Network World blog found HERE Continue reading

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

2014 UPDATE: Web Security Offerings From Cisco: Comparing the Latest Cisco CX Firewall to Cisco Web Security Appliance

update 2014 UPDATE: Web Security Offerings From Cisco: Comparing the Latest Cisco CX Firewall to Cisco Web Security Appliance

I wrote a post comparing Cisco’s Next Generation Firewall known as ASA CX vs. Cisco’s Web Security Appliance / Proxy known as WSA HERE. Here is a update to that post as requested by some readers.

In summary, the WSA is a security appliance that can act as a proxy focusing on network bound traffic such as port 80, 443 and 21. The ASA CX is an all ports and protocol firewall with reputation and IPS security (IPS being added in October 2013). Both solutions can provide reputation based security meaning stopping the attacker (more on this concept can be found HERE), Integrate with authentication systems such as Active Directory, can view HTTPS via decryption, application visibly with policy enforcement (IE identify and block Farmsville within Facebook) and detection of threats however detection methods are slightly different (one uses a combination of AV / malware engines while the other uses IPS).  Continue reading

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Next-Generation Intrusion Prevention Systems changing the game for Cyber

My buddy Aamir Lakhani wrote about how traditional security products such as Stateful firewalls and older IPS/IDS solutions are not cutting it for today’s level of threats. This post covers why the “Next-Generation” of security technology matters. The original post can be found HERE

Organizations are replacing their Stateful firewalls with Next-Generation firewalls (NGFW) and Next-Generation Intrusion Prevention systems (NGIPS).  Most traditional firewalls are nothing more than packet filters that keep track of who initiated the traffic to automatically allow response traffic back to originator. IPS vendors such as Sourcefire and McAfee (Intel Security) are rapidly adding advanced features to protect against insider threats, application vulnerabilities, mobile devices, and malware. One must wonder are the days of traditional perimeter security devices such as Stateful firewalls and single-pass IDS systems numbered?

Motivation 1024x634 Next Generation Intrusion Prevention Systems changing the game for Cyber Continue reading

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 4.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Stopping Both Attackers and Attacks – The Future of Network Security

image1 Stopping Both Attackers and Attacks – The Future of Network Security

The future of security must reach beyond the capability of an appliance. There are too many attack vectors that are continuously changing to detect with a silo solution. It basically comes down to this …. there are only so many signatures that can be checked against as well as behavior algorithms that can be put in place before you must let traffic pass. Odds are, a malicious attacker will eventually bypass detection based on the fact that there are hackers out there with a rack of all the latest vendor IPS, Firewalls, etc. in a lab designed to test how effective a piece of malware is against any enterprise security solution. So in a nutshell, you will only be able to stop the majority of attacks launched against your network. Something will eventually get through. This means detecting and preventing can’t be your only security strategy. Continue reading

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 4.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Comparing ASA Management: Internal vs. External Cisco Prime Security Manager Overview

management Comparing ASA Management: Internal vs. External Cisco Prime Security Manager Overview

Management of security devices is a critical function for maintaining the best performance and being aware of security related events. Cisco has released their second generation of ASA, which includes new management options. This post will cover the new management interface and compare it to the previous options. Continue reading

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Chained Exploits compromise valuable Twitter account

Aamir Lakhani from drchaos.com wrote a good article on how chaining together social engineering tactics compromised a highly visible twitter account. The original post can be found HERE

Who can we trust? It’s a tough question. We think we can trust our friends, co-workers, mentors, and colleagues because they are people we see and interact with often as frequently as we do with our family members. Unfortunately, there is risk in trusting others, particularly when those we trust have privileged access to our accounts and sensitive information. When our trust and exposure extends to those who we work with, and incorporates intimate knowledge of our business concerns, corporate cultural developments, and technology secrets, we must face the reality of insider threats. Unlike external attackers, those we consider to be on the inside of our trust circles do not need to hunt for valuable information, nor do they need to exploit strong perimeter defenses; insiders already know what is valuable and where it is stored.

FTDCircle Chained Exploits compromise valuable Twitter account Continue reading

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)